Zombie Prom Design

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Zombie Prom Production Design

 

Production Design/ Poster Design/ Illustration: Short Film

Zombie Prom

 

Zombies! Music! Dancing! Based off the off-Broadway musical from the 80s, this short film was an epic undertaking.

 

My involvement in the project started very early. Originally I met with the writer/director Vince Marcello and one of his producers just as an artistic consultant. Style and tone stuff. There were plans on getting a real production designer and art department, so I was just there to help organize the ideas they already had and how to apply them so they looked authentic to the 1950s.

 

By the end of production, not only was I doing some pick-up design work, but also animated sequences and actually ran the set as the 1st Assistant Director! It was a project of love and we all loved working on it.

 

One of the most important parts of the film that I designed was the nuclear power plant. In the story, the power plant is actually a tourist attraction, so it needed a fun, campy look to it. I suggested putting a googie architectural  style on it, and incorporate some bright colors.

 

I put some sketches together and lots and lots of notes. We then sent them over to 3-D modeler dude, Phil Broste [ www.chaoscowboy.com ], who brought the drawings closer to reality. Though a virtual one. For the final step, Phil worked with the boys at ILM who were handling the special effects and got that thing into the world of Zombie Prom.

 

For the inside of the power plant, we knew that we'd be shooting on location. What was needed then was some simple dressing and props for the set. First off was a fake brochure for the place. There was a time when we thought it would play up front and center, so a lot of detail went into it. I both took and already had photos for the people on the front. Very funny when you know who they are.

 

The last details for the set were signs. Directional arrows for attractions and larger information and promotional posters .